Photo by John Nakano

Much to their chagrin, Tech students are now awake and headed to classes, preparing to embark on another day of social interaction and the leaden lecture tones of their professors. They look around and think, soon they will be out of here, making a name at some big Fortune 500 company or leading their own company into the future of innovation. Yet, as one recent Tech guest speaker had to say, innovation comes with a price: collaboration.

Last Wednesday, the Sheller College of Business’s Institute for Leadership and Entrepreneurship  held another lecture in their “IMPACT speakers series. This week’s lecture  featured Sarah Miller Caldicott, CEO of Power Patterns of Innovation and great-grandniece to Thomas Edison.

Caldicott effortlessly discussed the transformation of innovation, connecting her ideas with those of her great uncle’s Thomas Edison and making them applicable to life today.

In her lecture, Caldicott enthusiastically pursued the topic of how collaboration drives innovation in the current digital era, looking at it through the same scope, which gave rise to Edison’s success in both invention and innovation in the later nineteenth century.

She talked about how organizations can implement such stratagems to better overcome the change in society as people cope with the complexity of living in the digital age, but the lessons learned could be transmogrified over to Tech’s campus: how Tech students can better themselves through empowering others.

Her lecture highlighted how Edison was one of the first business leaders to encourage deeper connections among colleagues with his idea of “Midnight Lunches,” where workers would gather at night and exchange their different experiments to soon discuss what each of them thought of the others’ work.

Edison’s constructive criticism came weaved within personal stories. Then, Caldicott’s speech seemed to bring up a  fundamental question: Why can’t her own words and Edison’s ideas be applied to Tech?

Caldicott emphasized that people should strive for a work environment similar to what Edison created. When applied to Tech, this means that students could strive to branch-off into small groups to do research or, on an even simpler scale, to do homework.

The smaller group, according to Caldicott, will lead to internal debates and internal struggles, but will ultimately lead to a greater group dynamic because of interaction among the members of a group.

Caldicott believes that it is when groups or organizations do not interact which leads to their inevitable downfall.

Caldicott mentioned how many people associate progress with tangible numbers or a percentage increase, but progress can also be reduced to a simplistic form: how a group comes to interact and whether discussion is freely and easily happening.

She also highlighted another key point: the process of finding answers.

Caldicott believes that life isn’t about finding a solution, but about understanding the question. She questions why someone should know what a simple number or complex algorithm can give them  if there is no way of placing any meaning behind it. She believes that if people invoke a form of discovery learning where they strive to ask questions, a solution will present itself.

Caldicott’s lecture sought to prove that Tech students, like all people,  live in a generation that strives to be connected socially. In this society, Caldicott believes,  everyone should stop to consider how we can apply this love of connection to better our work and study environments.

tudents are now awake and headed to classes, preparing to embark on another day of social interaction and the leaden lecture tones of their professors. They look around and think, soon they will be out of here, making a name at some big Fortune 500 company or leading their own company into the future of innovation. Yet, as one recent Tech guest speaker had to say, innovation comes with a price: collaboration.

Last Wednesday, the Sheller College of Business’s Institute for Leadership and Entrepreneurship  held another lecture in their “IMPACT speakers series. This week’s lecture  featured Sarah Miller Caldicott, CEO of Power Patterns of Innovation and great-grandniece to Thomas Edison.

Caldicott effortlessly discussed the transformation of innovation, connecting her ideas with those of her great uncle’s Thomas Edison and making them applicable to life today.

In her lecture, Caldicott enthusiastically pursued the topic of how collaboration drives innovation in the current digital era, looking at it through the same scope, which gave rise to Edison’s success in both invention and innovation in the later nineteenth century.

She talked about how organizations can implement such stratagems to better overcome the change in society as people cope with the complexity of living in the digital age, but the lessons learned could be transmogrified over to Tech’s campus: how Tech students can better themselves through empowering others.

Her lecture highlighted how Edison was one of the first business leaders to encourage deeper connections among colleagues with his idea of “Midnight Lunches,” where workers would gather at night and exchange their different experiments to soon discuss what each of them thought of the others’ work.

Edison’s constructive criticism came weaved within personal stories. Then, Caldicott’s speech seemed to bring up a  fundamental question: Why can’t her own words and Edison’s ideas be applied to Tech?

Caldicott emphasized that people should strive for a work environment similar to what Edison created. When applied to Tech, this means that students could strive to branch-off into small groups to do research or, on an even simpler scale, to do homework.

The smaller group, according to Caldicott, will lead to internal debates and internal struggles, but will ultimately lead to a greater group dynamic because of interaction among the members of a group.

Caldicott believes that it is when groups or organizations do not interact which leads to their inevitable downfall.

Caldicott mentioned how many people associate progress with tangible numbers or a percentage increase, but progress can also be reduced to a simplistic form: how a group comes to interact and whether discussion is freely and easily happening.

She also highlighted another key point: the process of finding answers.

Caldicott believes that life isn’t about finding a solution, but about understanding the question. She questions why someone should know what a simple number or complex algorithm can give them  if there is no way of placing any meaning behind it. She believes that if people invoke a form of discovery learning where they strive to ask questions, a solution will present itself.

Caldicott’s lecture sought to prove that Tech students, like all people,  live in a generation that strives to be connected socially. In this society, Caldicott believes,  everyone should stop to consider how we can apply this love of connection to better our work and study environments.

tudents are now awake and headed to classes, preparing to embark on another day of social interaction and the leaden lecture tones of their professors. They look around and think, soon they will be out of here, making a name at some big Fortune 500 company or leading their own company into the future of innovation. Yet, as one recent Tech guest speaker had to say, innovation comes with a price: collaboration.

Last Wednesday, the Sheller College of Business’s Institute for Leadership and Entrepreneurship  held another lecture in their “IMPACT speakers series. This week’s lecture  featured Sarah Miller Caldicott, CEO of Power Patterns of Innovation and great-grandniece to Thomas Edison.

Caldicott effortlessly discussed the transformation of innovation, connecting her ideas with those of her great uncle’s Thomas Edison and making them applicable to life today.

In her lecture, Caldicott enthusiastically pursued the topic of how collaboration drives innovation in the current digital era, looking at it through the same scope, which gave rise to Edison’s success in both invention and innovation in the later nineteenth century.

She talked about how organizations can implement such stratagems to better overcome the change in society as people cope with the complexity of living in the digital age, but the lessons learned could be transmogrified over to Tech’s campus: how Tech students can better themselves through empowering others.

Her lecture highlighted how Edison was one of the first business leaders to encourage deeper connections among colleagues with his idea of “Midnight Lunches,” where workers would gather at night and exchange their different experiments to soon discuss what each of them thought of the others’ work.

Edison’s constructive criticism came weaved within personal stories. Then, Caldicott’s speech seemed to bring up a  fundamental question: Why can’t her own words and Edison’s ideas be applied to Tech?

Caldicott emphasized that people should strive for a work environment similar to what Edison created. When applied to Tech, this means that students could strive to branch-off into small groups to do research or, on an even simpler scale, to do homework.

The smaller group, according to Caldicott, will lead to internal debates and internal struggles, but will ultimately lead to a greater group dynamic because of interaction among the members of a group.

Caldicott believes that it is when groups or organizations do not interact which leads to their inevitable downfall.

Caldicott mentioned how many people associate progress with tangible numbers or a percentage increase, but progress can also be reduced to a simplistic form: how a group comes to interact and whether discussion is freely and easily happening.

She also highlighted another key point: the process of finding answers.

Caldicott believes that life isn’t about finding a solution, but about understanding the question. She questions why someone should know what a simple number or complex algorithm can give them  if there is no way of placing any meaning behind it. She believes that if people invoke a form of discovery learning where they strive to ask questions, a solution will present itself.

Caldicott’s lecture sought to prove that Tech students, like all people,  live in a generation that strives to be connected socially. In this society, Caldicott believes,  everyone should stop to consider how we can apply this love of connection to better our work and study environments.

tudents are now awake and headed to classes, preparing to embark on another day of social interaction and the leaden lecture tones of their professors. They look around and think, soon they will be out of here, making a name at some big Fortune 500 company or leading their own company into the future of innovation. Yet, as one recent Tech guest speaker had to say, innovation comes with a price: collaboration.

Last Wednesday, the Sheller College of Business’s Institute for Leadership and Entrepreneurship  held another lecture in their “IMPACT speakers series. This week’s lecture  featured Sarah Miller Caldicott, CEO of Power Patterns of Innovation and great-grandniece to Thomas Edison.

Caldicott effortlessly discussed the transformation of innovation, connecting her ideas with those of her great uncle’s Thomas Edison and making them applicable to life today.

In her lecture, Caldicott enthusiastically pursued the topic of how collaboration drives innovation in the current digital era, looking at it through the same scope, which gave rise to Edison’s success in both invention and innovation in the later nineteenth century.

She talked about how organizations can implement such stratagems to better overcome the change in society as people cope with the complexity of living in the digital age, but the lessons learned could be transmogrified over to Tech’s campus: how Tech students can better themselves through empowering others.

Her lecture highlighted how Edison was one of the first business leaders to encourage deeper connections among colleagues with his idea of “Midnight Lunches,” where workers would gather at night and exchange their different experiments to soon discuss what each of them thought of the others’ work.

Edison’s constructive criticism came weaved within personal stories. Then, Caldicott’s speech seemed to bring up a  fundamental question: Why can’t her own words and Edison’s ideas be applied to Tech?

Caldicott emphasized that people should strive for a work environment similar to what Edison created. When applied to Tech, this means that students could strive to branch-off into small groups to do research or, on an even simpler scale, to do homework.

The smaller group, according to Caldicott, will lead to internal debates and internal struggles, but will ultimately lead to a greater group dynamic because of interaction among the members of a group.

Caldicott believes that it is when groups or organizations do not interact which leads to their inevitable downfall.

Caldicott mentioned how many people associate progress with tangible numbers or a percentage increase, but progress can also be reduced to a simplistic form: how a group comes to interact and whether discussion is freely and easily happening.

She also highlighted another key point: the process of finding answers.

Caldicott believes that life isn’t about finding a solution, but about understanding the question. She questions why someone should know what a simple number or complex algorithm can give them  if there is no way of placing any meaning behind it. She believes that if people invoke a form of discovery learning where they strive to ask questions, a solution will present itself.

Caldicott’s lecture sought to prove that Tech students, like all people,  live in a generation that strives to be connected socially. In this society, Caldicott believes,  everyone should stop to consider how we can apply this love of connection to better our work and study environments.